23rd September, 2014

thegreenwolf:

cowgirlwisdom101:

thefreckledavantgardegoober:

mysticmisfit89:

Meanwhile, in prehistoric Canada…..

No no, you don’t understand, moose really do get that big. Take it from a Canadian. I’ve seen that bullshit in person. Scary as all heck.

I can second that statement!

Reminder that until several thousand years ago, megafauna were a LOT more common, to include in North America, and the moose is just a fair-to-middling sized species.
thegreenwolf:

cowgirlwisdom101:

thefreckledavantgardegoober:

mysticmisfit89:

Meanwhile, in prehistoric Canada…..

No no, you don’t understand, moose really do get that big. Take it from a Canadian. I’ve seen that bullshit in person. Scary as all heck.

I can second that statement!

Reminder that until several thousand years ago, megafauna were a LOT more common, to include in North America, and the moose is just a fair-to-middling sized species.

thegreenwolf:

cowgirlwisdom101:

thefreckledavantgardegoober:

mysticmisfit89:

Meanwhile, in prehistoric Canada…..

No no, you don’t understand, moose really do get that big. Take it from a Canadian. I’ve seen that bullshit in person. Scary as all heck.

I can second that statement!

Reminder that until several thousand years ago, megafauna were a LOT more common, to include in North America, and the moose is just a fair-to-middling sized species.

(Source: outdooroddities.com, via congalineofdurin)

21st September, 2014

obstinaterixatrix:

okay I’m reading another book for Multicultural education and it’s just SO REFRESHING to read about people calling out American history textbooks I mean

Omitting the accomplishments of the Phoenicians is ironic, because it was Prince Henry’s knowledge of their feats that inspired him to replicate them. But this information clashes with another social archetype: our culture views modern technology as a European development. So the Phoenicians’ feats do not conform to the textbooks’ overall story line about how white Europeans taught the rest of the world how to do things. None of the textbooks credits the Muslims with preserving Greek wisdom, enhancing it with ideas from China, India, and Africa, and then passing the resulting knowledge to Europe via Spain and Italy. Instead, they show Henry inventing navigation and imply that before Europe there was nothing, at least nothing modern.

thank

21st September, 2014

neighbourly:

I think we’ve officially reached that annoying time in the year where it’s sweater weather in the morning, but by midday, if you wear a sweater, you die from heatstroke.

every year i wait for this post. it always comes right on time

(Source: ididntasktobemade, via smithie1674)

21st September, 2014

fatallywhimsical:

benedictbooty:

Remember Wendy Davis?

image

You know, the badass democrat who fillibustered for 11 hours straight to conserve women’s rights in Texas?

image

Well, this wonderful and amazing woman has announced her campaign for Texas governor!

image

Let’s show her some goddamn support!

Her opponent, Greg Abbott, is all about “traditional values.”

 What fucking good have “traditional values” ever done for anyone?

Not a goddamn thing, that’s what. Vote for Wendy Davis.

(via pastelkanaya)

21st September, 2014

“You must not reduce yourself to a puddle just because the person you like is afraid to swim and you are a fierce sea to them; because there will be someone who was born with love of the waves within their blood, and they will look at you with fear and respect.”

— T.B. LaBerge // Things I’m Still Learning at 25 (via tblaberge)

(via averyboleyn)

20th September, 2014

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

(via yusefwoof)

20th September, 2014

sazquatch:

The huge amount of pressure on young girls to let their boyfriends get away with everything and not to stand up for themselves, lest they stop being a ‘chill girlfriend’ and instead become a horrible, controlling harpy is such bullshit.

Stop teaching young girls that demanding to be treated with respect and courtesy makes them shrill, over-emotional, or unworthy of listening to.

(via congalineofdurin)

20th September, 2014

cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.
Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.
                                               :-)
cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.
Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.
                                               :-)
cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.
Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.
                                               :-)
cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.
Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.
                                               :-)
cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.
Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.
                                               :-)
cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.
Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.
                                               :-)
cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.
Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.
                                               :-)
cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.
Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.
                                               :-)
cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.
Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.
                                               :-)

cross-connect:

Jared Muralt was born in 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. Though he attended art school for one year in Bern, Muralt is primarily self-taught, and he developed his precision and skill through the careful study of books as diverse as those pertaining to anatomy, art history and comics. Muralt is also co-founder of BlackYard studio, a Swiss illustration and graphic design agency that was honored with Bern’s Advancement Award for Design in 2009.

Muralt is largely inspired by the quotidian: his sketchbooks, which he carries with him at all times, are filled with fascinating studies of people, scientific inventions and the animal kingdom.

                                               :-)

(via cross-connect)